From Amazon

Fascinating Read

A fascinating read that was hard to put down. Ms. Davidson's story is a triumph of the soul of a little girl over tremendous adversity.
The story is told with understanding and insight that gives hope for a better future. Thank you for a wonderful read..

Tom Sanderlin

A Book That touches the Heart!!

This book is rich material for a highly successful film to create public awareness!Its themes bear relevance to dysfunctional parenting, child abuse, the transcendent quality of love beyond racial lines, the strength of the human spirit to survive against all odds, and the powerful effects of childhood memories on the psyche and adult relationships.

The unique story is about a child who survived abuse and neglect by her parents due to the love and support she received from the African Americans who raised her. From the dramatic scenes of her childhood to the flashbacks that came when Anne, as an adult, created choreography in her Dutch Dance studio, to the deep conversations later on in which her old nanny confirmed her memories, the author leads us through a fast-moving narrative, deep, light, and funny. The healthy family spirit of Holland reminds Anne of the Black people who had warmed her heart as a child before she was forced to forget them when they left her parental home. The book describes a child who experiences love from a nurturing caretaker in a birth-family of heartless physical and emotional abuse; it is a tale of triumph and survival through psychotherapy, strong relationships, and the release of emotions through creative expressions of music and dance. It is a highly appealing tale for family discussions!

Mavis Aldridge

 

I couldn't put it down. Ms. Davidson writes with such poignancy and passion. At times painful, at other times joyous, this is a wonderfully authentic story. This is a voice that needs to be heard.

Deborah Staunton

 

An abusive childhood did not kill this wonderful spirit. Anne reclaimed her life little by little. If it hadn't been the glimpses of love from her Black caretakers, Anne would never have thought to make her life better. I love her last chapter (Understanding Those I Loved)  where she reviews her life and discusses the important place that Black women and sometimes Black men have had in the lives of young White children.
Anne opens her heart in this memoir and lets you see inside. Amazing story! Amazing woman!

nhelleks

                                                                                                                                         

This depiction of Anne Davidson's Gothic childhood, her loss of the loving people who saved her, and her riveting account of her self-directed therapy make this book a compelling read. This is not a fluffy "beach read." Anne's story explores the dark side of human behavior and the profound healing power of love and dance. It's truly fascinating, made more so because it's true.

                                                                                                                                                 Cheryl Olin

 

"My favorite books are biographies. People have so many stories to tell. This one is brutally honest. I can only say to the author, thank you for sharing this with us. I really hope you can help people that have been through what you felt , thought and suffered.
I don't know how you wrote it so well, I could not put it down. Thank you again for writing it."

Gail R.

 

"I couldn't put this book down! What an outstanding autobiography of an abusive childhood and how she slowly worked her way through it. Intense, compassionate, well written. You really went along with her in the story. You never lose interest. Her recollections and descriptions were first rate. It gave real power to the possibility of healing.
I don't know anything about dance, so I skimmed that small part, but as a Registered Nurse specializing in trauma, I know first hand the healing power of physical movement to overcome trauma. Probably unknowingly, she really is on the forefront of healing theory."


Jennifer Elliott, RN